blackraincloud:

so-treu:

questionall:

Thanks to US Uncut for this! BREAKING: Detroit’s unelected emergency manager, Kevyn Orr, has just relinquished control of the Detroit Water and Sewage Department, which is now back in the hands of the people. It’s expected the mayor and city council will approve a water affordability plan that caps a household’s water bill at no more than 3 percent of their income. Read more: http://abcn.ws/XavyWZ Thanks to groups like the Detroit Water Brigade for the weeks of ongoing pressure to stop the shutoffs! Direct action gets the goods. Read their statement on this victory here: http://bit.ly/1o9yqbT

!!!!!

As of yesterday, you can now make payment arrangements by phone. 
Yes, that is correct. BEFORE YESTERDAY people had to personally go TO the water and sewage department to make payment arrangements.  
What happens if you don’t have transportation? What happens if you’re disabled? What happens if you’re sick? What happens if you work all day and Water and Sewage ain’t open when you get off?
Yeah.
People have been lining up out the door and in the parking lot for HOURS to make late payments and payment arrangements.
Now they can at least handle this mess over the gotdamn phone.

blackraincloud:

so-treu:

questionall:

Thanks to US Uncut for this! BREAKING: Detroit’s unelected emergency manager, Kevyn Orr, has just relinquished control of the Detroit Water and Sewage Department, which is now back in the hands of the people. It’s expected the mayor and city council will approve a water affordability plan that caps a household’s water bill at no more than 3 percent of their income. Read more: http://abcn.ws/XavyWZ Thanks to groups like the Detroit Water Brigade for the weeks of ongoing pressure to stop the shutoffs! Direct action gets the goods. Read their statement on this victory here: http://bit.ly/1o9yqbT

!!!!!

As of yesterday, you can now make payment arrangements by phone. 

Yes, that is correct. BEFORE YESTERDAY people had to personally go TO the water and sewage department to make payment arrangements.  

What happens if you don’t have transportation? What happens if you’re disabled? What happens if you’re sick? What happens if you work all day and Water and Sewage ain’t open when you get off?

Yeah.

People have been lining up out the door and in the parking lot for HOURS to make late payments and payment arrangements.

Now they can at least handle this mess over the gotdamn phone.

(via banji-realness)

theroguefeminist:

daughterofmulan:

Take a facet of crime, and then look at television shows/movies that feature those criminals as protagonists.

White mobs.

image

White pirates.

image

White serial killers.

image

White political corruption

image

White drug dealers

image

I mostly want to talk about this as a TV phenomenon, but pick a crime, any crime, and Western media has probably made a movie/TV series/play/etc. with a white person that romanticizes the criminal activity. No matter what, a white person can do whatever terrible crimes and still have a TV/movie fanbase that loves them.

When you see black or brown people committing crimes on screen, you are to see them thugs and criminal masterminds and people to be beat down.

When you see white people committing crimes on screen, you see a three-dimensional portrait of why someone might commit that crime, how criminals are people too, and how you should even love them for the crimes that they commit because they’re just providing for their families or they’ve wronged or they’re just people and not perfect. This is particularly a luxury given to white male characters, since there few white female criminals as protagonists.

If and of the above shows were about black or brown folks, there would be a backlash of (white) people claiming that TV and movies are romanticizing criminals and are treating them too much like heroes and that it will affect viewers and encourage violence and “thuggish” behavior. And yet fictional white criminals get to have a deep fanbase who loves these white criminals, receive accolades and awards, get called amazing television that portray the complexities of human nature. Viewers of these characters see past the atrocious crimes and into their humanity, a luxury that white characters always have while characters of color rarely do. The closest that mainstream TV has come to showing black criminals as main characters is probably The Wire, and even then, the criminals share equal screen time and equal status as main characters as the police trying to stop them.

The idea that crime can be so heavily romanticized and glorified to such a degree is undoubtedly a privilege given to white characters. The next time you hear someone talk about Dexter Morgan or Walter White in a positive way, it may be an opportunity to rethink how white people can always able to be seen as people no matter what they do, while everyone else can be boiled down to nothing but a criminal.

I always felt extremely uncomfortable with this trope because, not only is it racist, but it tends to feed into the already too common propensity society has to humanize, romanticize and exonerate irrevocably terrible white men. Like if you’re a white man and you commit awful crimes, you will likely go down in history as a legendary celebrity and historical figure

(via fonnatasha)

thechanelmuse:

Voices in Our Blood by Jon Meacham

Sister Outsider by Audre Lorde

Pedagogy of the Oppressed by Paulo Freire

Losing My Cool by Thomas Chatterton Williams

Black Picket Fences by Mary Pattillo-McCoy

The Hip Hop Generation by Bakari Kitwana

The Fire Next Time by James Baldwin

The Autobiography of Malcolm X by Alex Haley

The History of White People by Nell Irvin Painter

Policing The Crisis by Stuart Hall

The New Jim Crow: Mass Incarceration In the Age of Colorblindness by Michelle Alexander

White Like Me by Tim Wise

How The Irish Became White by Noel Ignatiev

Other People’s Children by Lisa Delpit

Punished: Policing the Lives of Black and Latino Boys by Victor M. Rios

(via blueklectic)

"My name is not Annie. It’s Quvenzhané."

Quvenzhané Wallis (then age 9) correcting an AP Reporter who said she was “just going to call her Annie” instead of learning how to pronounce her name. Never forget.  (via thechanelmuse)

(via fleshtemple)

dion-thesocialist:

All it takes is one event to set a precedent. If Darren Wilson is arrested for, charged with, and convicted of the murder of Michael Brown, then that means ALL cops can be held accountable for their actions. It means the people can ALWAYS rise up and fight back against police brutality. 

That’s what the cops and National Guard in Ferguson is fighting against. They don’t want this standard to be set.

(via blackqueerboi)

"

"White feminism" does not mean every white woman, everywhere, who happens to identify as feminist. It also doesn’t mean that every "white feminist" identifies as white. I see "white feminism" as a specific set of single-issue, non-intersectional, superficial feminist practices. It is the feminism we understand as mainstream; the feminism obsessed with body hair, and high heels and makeup, and changing your married name. It is the feminism you probably first learned. "White feminism" is the feminism that doesn’t understand western privilege, or cultural context. It is the feminism that doesn’t consider race as a factor in the struggle for equality.

White feminism is a set of beliefs that allows for the exclusion of issues that specifically affect women of colour. It is “one size-fits all” feminism, where middle class white women are the mould that others must fit. It is a method of practicing feminism, not an indictment of every individual white feminist, everywhere, always.

"

This Is What I Mean When I Say “White Feminism”

Please, everybody: read this article!

(via theyoungblackfeminist)

(via strugglingtobeheard)

"

Horror stories about Muslim misogyny have long been used by western patriarchs to justify imperialism abroad and sexism at home. The Guardian’s Katharine Viner reminds us about Lord Cromer, the British consul general in Egypt from 1883. Cromer believed the Egyptians were morally and culturally inferior in their treatment of women and that they should be “persuaded or forced” to become “civilised” by disposing of the veil.

"And what did this forward-thinking, feminist-sounding veil-burner do when he got home to Britain?" asks Viner. "He founded and presided over the Men’s League for Opposing Women’s Suffrage, which tried, by any means possible, to stop women getting the vote. Colonial patriarchs like Cromer … wanted merely to replace eastern misogyny with western misogyny." More than a century later, the same logic is used to imply that misogyny only matters when it isn’t being done by white men.

"

— Laurie Penny, “This isn’t ‘feminism.’ It’s Islamophobia.” (via cuddlyklaine)

(via wocinsolidarity)

extendedburning:

godtxt:

please do not let ferguson die out like everything else big does. do not let this die out. do not let this continue on for three days and then everyone forget about it. do not let this happen.

queue this post up 3 days from now, a week from now, a month from now, a month from then. make sure even if you forget your blog will remember.

(Source: angel-scum, via patchworkpoetics)

moderndayndnprincess:

ESPN’s The five faces of Shoni Schimmel (Umatilla Tribe)

For the ‘Finding her Voice’ picture (second one shown here)

Schimmel is just starting to realize how much weight her voice carries within the Native American community. Over the summer, she and her sister Jude, who also plays for Louisville, and their parents visited the Black Hills of South Dakota to speak with the residents there. When Louisville plays, even on the road, members of the Native American community wait for Shoni and Jude after the game. These fans want their kids to see the opportunities that exist beyond the reservation, beyond the scourge of drugs and alcohol and school truancy that stunts too many young lives.

And Shoni wants to show them how good life can be — if you keep your eyes up. “There’s so much more,” she says. “I want them to know that.”

In the past, Schimmel was reluctant to speak publicly about topics close to her heart, for fear she might turn people off. Now, she is gradually owning and accepting the megaphone that sports has given her. She is one of the most prominent athletes of Native American heritage, one who finds herself at the nexus of a hot-button issue: Should the NFL’s Washington Redskins change their nickname?

Two years ago, maybe even last year, Schimmel would have deflected the question. Not anymore.

"I would change the name of the Redskins mainly for the Native American people as a whole," Schimmel says. "It’s about respect for the Native American race, especially to not promote the racism carried over from the past. It was racist to be called a ‘redskin’ back in the day, so what makes it OK today? There isn’t a team called ‘whiteskins’ or ‘blackskins’ — how would that go over with the world?

"Just because what our people went through was hundreds of years ago doesn’t mean we forgot what happened, forgot what our elders went through. Changing the name would help give us, as Native Americans, the same equality that every other race wants."

More Here: http://espn.go.com/womens-college-basketball/preview2013/story/_/id/9939534/espnw-5-faces-louisville-senior-guard-shoni-schimmel

(via moyazb)