"You can’t ask a mother to moderately snatch her baby out of a burning house. Revolution is a serious thing, the most serious thing about a revolutionary’s life. When one commits oneself to the struggle, it must be for a lifetime."

— Angela Davis (via lastuli)

(Source: aroseinthebarrelofanak47, via blackfeminismlives)

"Forget what it sounds like for a minute, let’s consider the spirit of rock and roll: Rebellious. Energetic. Vocal. Independent. Driven. Unapologetic. Powerful. They’re characteristics I could attribute to damn-near every sister I know.

In fact, my personal Who’s Who of Rock and Roll is stacked with bomb Black women. Betty Davis. Grace Jones. Tina Turner. Aretha Franklin. Nona Hendryx. Poly Styrene. Joan Armatrading. Joyce Kennedy… and that’s just 1976-77.

So why do so many people go out of their way to marginalize or flat-out disregard Black women as both pioneers and torchbearers of rock? Why are we so indifferent to the fact that more than a few African-American women strapped an instrument to their back and helped carry the genre from the fields to the church to the juke joint to the charts to a multimillion-dollar industry?

Probably because someone told us it wasn’t ours and we chose to believe it. They said it was devil’s music, so we cast it out. We let it go because someone gave it white skin, a penis, and the green light to cross boundaries that Black people couldn’t. And in so doing, they convinced the world that our pioneers didn’t deserve equal recognition, equal exposure or equal ownership.

Damn shame.
"

Black Women In Rock: If Sister Rosetta Tharpe is too old school for you, then maybe Santigold flips your wig. Either way, sisters have been part of rock music for as long as guitar feedback’s been loud (via blackrockandrollmusic)

(via westindians)

fuckyeahsexeducation:

katelucia:

Jada Pinkett-Smith is aware of the critics that frown up their noses at the way she raises her daughter, Willow. Willow cuts, dyes and styles her hair as she pleases, a fact that bothers many who feel girls shouldn’t have that much control over their appearance at such a young age.
Jada decided to address the criticism in a Facebook post:

“A letter to a friend…This subject is old but I have never answered it in its entirety. And even with this post it will remain incomplete. The question why I would LET Willow cut her hair. First the LET must be challenged. This is a world where women, girls are constantly reminded that they don’t belong to themselves; that their bodies are not their own, nor their power or self determination. I made a promise to endow my little girl with the power to always know that her body, spirit and her mind are HER domain. Willow cut her hair because her beauty, her value, her worth is not measured by the length of her hair. It’s also a statement that claims that even little girls have the RIGHT to own themselves and should not be a slave to even their mother’s deepest insecurities, hopes and desires. Even little girls should not be a slave to the preconceived ideas of what a culture believes a little girl should be.”



I’m pretty sure I’ve reblogged this before but seriously this is something we should be teaching all our children. Their bodies are theirs, not ours as parents. As soon as you tell someone their body doesn’t belong to theirs you take away so much from them.

fuckyeahsexeducation:

katelucia:

Jada Pinkett-Smith is aware of the critics that frown up their noses at the way she raises her daughter, Willow. Willow cuts, dyes and styles her hair as she pleases, a fact that bothers many who feel girls shouldn’t have that much control over their appearance at such a young age.

Jada decided to address the criticism in a Facebook post:

“A letter to a friend…This subject is old but I have never answered it in its entirety. And even with this post it will remain incomplete. The question why I would LET Willow cut her hair. First the LET must be challenged. This is a world where women, girls are constantly reminded that they don’t belong to themselves; that their bodies are not their own, nor their power or self determination. I made a promise to endow my little girl with the power to always know that her body, spirit and her mind are HER domain. Willow cut her hair because her beauty, her value, her worth is not measured by the length of her hair. It’s also a statement that claims that even little girls have the RIGHT to own themselves and should not be a slave to even their mother’s deepest insecurities, hopes and desires. Even little girls should not be a slave to the preconceived ideas of what a culture believes a little girl should be.”

image

I’m pretty sure I’ve reblogged this before but seriously this is something we should be teaching all our children. Their bodies are theirs, not ours as parents. As soon as you tell someone their body doesn’t belong to theirs you take away so much from them.

(via theladyinthestripeddress)

"If you look deeply into the palm of your hand, you will see your parents and all generations of your ancestors. All of them are alive in this moment. Each is present in your body. You are the continuation of each of these people."

—  Thích Nhất Hạnh (via purplebuddhaproject)

(via loveisthewateroflife)

"Gentrification is the result of not only policy decisions and economic incentives but also discourse that imagines neighborhoods of color as pathological and criminal, necessitating outside intervention for the good of all. We see the recent efforts to blame “Black Twitter” for divisions, to identify women of color feminism as a “toxic” intrusion, as not only an effort to reclaim these spaces but as attempting to do so while locating the OTHER as the problem."

Suey Park and Dr. David J. Leonard, In Defense of Twitter Feminism

In a world where the voices of white middle-class heterosexual men and women are privileged, it is striking that Twitter, one of the few spaces that allows for counternarratives and resistance, is now facing a barrage of criticism…women of color are already excluded from major publishing platforms, but are reprimanded for using available platforms such as Twitter and tumblr to write their own stories.

The reaction white feminists are having to women of color feminists entering Twitter tends to problematize those who point out racism rather than question the integrity of the framework

In short, white feminists going to a place where woman of color feminist are having a discussion (without invitation) and telling her how to do feminism (gentrification), as their approach is seen as problematic and toxic.

(via fuckyeahethnicwomen)

(Source: magnius159, via fuckyeahethnicwomen)

"

I can’t recall another period with such a wide-ranging mainstream presence as this Carefree Black Girl archetype. You may recognize it as Willow Smith rocking a pink Mohawk, Corinne Bailey Rae sauntering around Paris, Janelle Monáe serving android realness, and 100% of Solange Knowles’ life on Instagram.

I don’t know if any of these ladies would identify as such, but their influence is deeply felt and appreciated in CFBG spaces. They exhibit the qualities we all cherish to a wider audience that isn’t regularly exposed to the multitudes of black female creativity.


While the visual presence of Carefree Black Girls is exciting, some might wonder what would prompt such a hyper-specific expression. By putting the word “carefree” front and center, it’s making a statement that we don’t want to be solely defined by hardships and stereotypes so we can enjoy our lives as we please. Carefree should not be mistaken with careless. This particular audience is equally exposed to content exploring identity, culture, and history and its implications on them. There’s a clear reverence for the difficulties they might face but an equal focus on embracing the qualities that make them unique and beautiful. The idea also embodies not letting an outside gaze rule the way you express yourself.

Overall, I think Carefree Black Girl is a lovely and much-needed step in the right direction when it comes to exploring black identities. There may be concern that it lends itself to a passing trend or restrictive roles, but fear not. The absolute worst case scenario is that girls might start wearing floral headbands and feeling great about themselves. And, that sounds like a pretty magical prospect, if you ask me.

"

Who Exactly Is “The Carefree Black Girl”?

By Jamala Johns 

(via loveisthenewpunk)

(Source: refinery29.com, via theladyinthestripeddress)

nowyoukno:

Now You Know (Source)

ethiopienne:

CeCe McDonald, Reina Gossett, and Dean Spade: Police & prisons don’t keep us safe—we keep each other safe

(via navigatethestream)

medievalpoc:

psqqa:

medievalpoc:

soleminisanction:

medievalpoc:

spacealtie:

medievalpoc:

ringtales:

medievalpoc:

Atanarjuat: The Fast Runner

Speaking of movies, this is basically Inuit Beowulf.

It was written, produced, directed, and acted entirely by Inuit people. I think a lot of people might be interested in Medieval Inuit art and literature, and this is a pretty great example.

You can watch and download the entire trilogy here for free (but donate if you can!!!); Atanarjuat is the first film and takes place around 1000 A.D.-ish. It also won a LOT of awards. Keep in mind: it’s entirely in Inuktitut, with English subtitles.

it’s a stunning movie

I’ve now finished watching the entire trilogy, and I have to say that all three films are mind-blowingly amazing.

Make sure you have a box of tissues, though because they will leave you pretty weepy.

I’ve watched it saturday und it is absolutely fascinating to see ancient inuits through the eyes of modern inuits !

Oh, absolutely! I love how they created the script, with double-checking on the action and the dialogue, and different elders pointing out small inconsistencies like, “Oh, no, they wouldn’t have spoken to each other at that point, it was illegal back then.” I love that they tried to make it as historically accurate as possible.

Video Interviews with the cast are available too.

Additional cool thing: the company that created this trilogy, Isuma, has since transformed their website into an indigenous people’s web TV channel. So what sites like ThatGuyWithTheGlasses, ScrewAttack, and the Escapist are for geeky pursuits, IsumaTV attempting to be for indigenous creators. 

Check them out, they’re pretty cool. 

^^I didn’t know that! Amazing!!

A few years ago the director, Zacharias Kunuk, also made the first documentary to discuss climate change from the perspective of the Inuit, focusing on their own traditional body of knowledge regarding the environment. It’s called Qapirangajuq: Inuit Knowledge and Climate Change and can be found here.

I am absolutely going to watch that, and wanted to reblog so others can have the opportunity to do so. Thank you!

(via womanistgamergirl)

cynique:

popculturebrain:

Leading Men Age, Leading Women Don’t | Vulture

There are more charts if you click through.

I’m so glad this info graphic is going around, because so many people don’t realize how ageism and misogyny play hand in hand and how the sexualization of young girls play into this.

(via loveisthewateroflife)